check out the new remote control Jockey Wheel SmartBar Solid GPS Caravan Tracking System Powertec Caframo fans
Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: On the road with health issues.


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 23
Date:
On the road with health issues.


I am having a "three quarter life" crisis I think. I have just reached the ripe old age of 75, my wife has decided someone else will offer her a better life & I still have the Wanderlust that I contracted many years ago.  With no family to hold me back, I am seriously thinking about getting back "on the Wallaby". I have reached the stage of deciding to have a split rig or a motor-home. I have used both so have an idea about the benefits of both BUT it is a possibility that I may need some medium term treatment at some stage so having a caravan to park up could have an advantage over a single rig, it seems. I will not have a base. I am sure there are many others in a similar stage of life and I would appreciate your thoughts.



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 7467
Date:

Ian, If it were me; I wouldn't be rushing in to purchase any RV. I would load up my current vehicle with some camping gear and wander off into a remote location. Sitting beside a body of water and contemplate my impending choices whilst letting the mind meander off whilst staring into the camp-fire.

__________________

Possum; AKA:- Ali El-Aziz Mohamed Gundawiathan

Sent from my imperial66 typewriter using carrier pigeon, message sticks and smoke signals.



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5902
Date:

Physically write in a text book ideas & thoughts, it helps get difficult things off your mind which often turn into smaller problems. Use the equipment you have now. Don't spend big money for 12 months.



__________________

Procrastination, mankind's greatest labour saving device!

50L custom fuel rack 6x20W 100/20mppt 4x26Ah gel 28L super insulated fridge TPMS 3 ARB compressors heatsink fan cooled 4L tank aftercooler Air/water OCD cleaning 4 stage car acoustic insulation.



Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 23
Date:

Thanks Possum3. I reckon that would make me rush off to the nearest yard & buy the first rig I saw lol. It is mainly not wanting to wait the last 12 months for final clearance of a health matter & border closures that are causing me to be cautious about making the move.

 



-- Edited by ian72 on Sunday 10th of October 2021 11:13:47 AM

__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4386
Date:

If, like me, you will not have a house to which you can return as a base then I am absolutely adamant than a caravan and tow car is a far more suitable vehicle(s) than a motorhome. Motorhomes are fine for holidays but not for living in.

This will be a massive change for you so don't underestimate its emotional as well as practical impact.

Fitness wise: I have a rule of thumb I mention to others of our advanced years who like the idea of this (living in the bush) lifestyle; it can be physically demanding and I suggest you need to be able to carry 25L of water 25m, load it into a car and do that four times. If that is beyond your ability then I think you will find this life very hard.

I wish you well in your choices.



__________________

 

"I beseech you in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken"

Oliver Cromwell, 3rd August 1650 - in a letter to the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 203
Date:

I'm with possum on this
It's a big decision to not have a home base, and they do say not to make huge life decisions for at least 12 months after a major life change like separation.
But I get that you could really do with a change and don't want to wait for another year 'life's short' and we've already lost so much time because of Covid.
I gather you live in Qld; I would be loading up your current vehicle and going somewhere in Qld ASAP go somewhere you haven't been before, see new sights, meet new people 'feel the serenity'. Take some weeks to rediscover yourself as a single while the country gets a handle on the Covid situation.
Whatever you do be kind to yourself

__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 23
Date:

Thank you.



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1690
Date:

Mike Harding wrote:

If, like me, you will not have a house to which you can return as a base then I am absolutely adamant than a caravan and tow car is a far more suitable vehicle(s) than a motorhome. Motorhomes are fine for holidays but not for living in.

This will be a massive change for you so don't underestimate its emotional as well as practical impact.

Fitness wise: I have a rule of thumb I mention to others of our advanced years who like the idea of this (living in the bush) lifestyle; it can be physically demanding and I suggest you need to be able to carry 25L of water 25m, load it into a car and do that four times. If that is beyond your ability then I think you will find this life very hard.

I wish you well in your choices.





mike being a young man trying to impress us with his physical prowess doing 25 litrs x 25 meters x 4 ,you can get 10 liter cans ,park closer, an take all day. more than one way to get the job done

__________________


Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 85
Date:

Hi ,I would as others suggest ,pack your gear in present rig,go for trip to somewhere you have not seen.

Try to meet people,take it easy and have a good think about things.

Rv ok for holiday ,You will need a base /house to come back to if medical situation gets worse.Big decision to make .take care Roker

 

 



__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 23
Date:

Thanks for the advice.

I am surprised there a need to cart that much.

In the past (with 2 on board) I had 2 x 90 litre tanks fitted, (plus toilet & hws), 3 jerry cans, 3 collapsible spare cans filled before I set up camp should see me right for a few weeks and an old golf buggy for the cassette.

Drive if I choose a split rig.

I am into energy (mine mainly) conservation ha ha.

I do take your point about the fitness level required though. 



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4386
Date:

The 25L x 25m x 4 is,of course, merely an indication which occured to me recently when chatting with someone who was interested in this sort of lifestyle, nevertheless it is, I feel, indicative of the sort of effort required on a daily basis.

As dogbox suggests one can reduce the water container size, as I have done to 15L, but one cannot reduce the weight of the generator (30kg in some cases)  or the 25L of petrol or the logs one hauls back to camp... you get the idea. A 50 year old friend who is a fitness person recently stayed with me for a few days and commented he was surprised how much exercise I took each day simply through camp chores.

All this is, of course, good for a body but it is a factor to consider before adopting this lifestyle.

Regarding Roker's comment about needing a house in the case of illness: I considered this before embarking upon my current course a few years past and I don't see why a house is a necessity in the case of illness. Should illness eventuate my plan is to check into a decent caravan park and hook up to power and water, other than having to empty my toilet once a week there is not much difference to a house.



__________________

 

"I beseech you in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken"

Oliver Cromwell, 3rd August 1650 - in a letter to the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1209
Date:

Sometimes you might have to carry water,most times you can just pump it.

Just turn on the tap and instant water,to easy.All you need is a pump and a battery

water.jpg



Attachments
__________________


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 23
Date:

Mike,

Thank you very much for your experienced input which is what I was seeking. 

My preference is to spend time at fewer places rather than travel most of the time, so am very much leaning towards a caravan for this next stage.

I understand the physical requirements and have seen that this list of labour saving devices has grown since I last toured. Items such as Trail a Mate jacks that can be left on the A- Frame, slide out shelves to mount a Generator &/or washing machine on, 12v Drivers to wind legs, 12v Chain Saws which are lighter, Collapsible crates on wheels to cart Toilet Cassettes, timber etc so while it is all extra to carry (and I am still adding the weights & costs up), I am optimistic that I can offset physical deficiencies as they creep up on me.

You have also addressed my main concern which was the situation whereby I needed to "hole-up" for any treatment & recuperation & staying at a decent caravan park is a good solution. On reflection, I have encountered people in this scenario, so thank you for reminding me.

I have now been dealing with this project for about 6 months & as I doubt that I will get much younger, the time is rapidly approaching for me to get set up. Happily the signs of border openings appears more positive & it always seemed to be a good time to "hit the road" after the log week end in January, so that will be the target.

See you :"on the Wallaby",

Ian 



__________________


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 203
Date:

Sounds like a good plan
Happy travels

__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4386
Date:

Hi Ian

My style of living on the road is also one of staying in one place for a lengthy period with a couple of months being quite common for me.

There is much which can be done to mitigate the physical effort involved in camping but it's not possible to eliminate it - I don't wish to focus on or exaggerate it but it is a reality.

> "hit the road" after the log week end in January, so that will be the target.

Excellent! :) I hope it goes well for you.

Do not underestimate the emotional impact of such a huge life change, it took me a few weeks for my emotions to fully settle down. I found something which was very important to me was to turn my caravan into my "home" ASAP. I'm not quite sure how to explain that and I suspect it's different for everyone but for me it meant organising things properly so everything was put away and the van tidy but also that I knew, for example, which cupboard things were in and I could cook a decent meal... just making it a "home".

In total I think it took around one year plus before I was totally comfortable with my new lifestyle. You *will* make mistakes, you *will* waste some money so don't beat up on yourself for so doing, it's just a learning process we all have to go through.

Feel free to stay in touch, my e-mail address is in my profile, or PM me if you wish.



__________________

 

"I beseech you in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken"

Oliver Cromwell, 3rd August 1650 - in a letter to the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1690
Date:

Mike Harding wrote:

Hi Ian

My style of living on the road is also one of staying in one place for a lengthy period with a couple of months being quite common for me.

There is much which can be done to mitigate the physical effort involved in camping but it's not possible to eliminate it - I don't wish to focus on or exaggerate it but it is a reality.

> "hit the road" after the log week end in January, so that will be the target.

Excellent! :) I hope it goes well for you.

Do not underestimate the emotional impact of such a huge life change, it took me a few weeks for my emotions to fully settle down. I found something which was very important to me was to turn my caravan into my "home" ASAP. I'm not quite sure how to explain that and I suspect it's different for everyone but for me it meant organising things properly so everything was put away and the van tidy but also that I knew, for example, which cupboard things were in and I could cook a decent meal... just making it a "home".

In total I think it took around one year plus before I was totally comfortable with my new lifestyle. You *will* make mistakes, you *will* waste some money so don't beat up on yourself for so doing, it's just a learning process we all have to go through.

Feel free to stay in touch, my e-mail address is in my profile, or PM me if you wish.





excellent post

__________________


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 164
Date:

Good on you Ian

10 plus years ago, I decided to sell up and hit the road fulltime. I wont ever return to a house so Ill die on the road somewhere

I've had motorhomes and caravans and would not recommend a motorhome due to the lack of liveability.

Everytime you need to go somewhere, you need to pack up everything. PIA

As others have said, water is your main consideration. I use 3 x 25 l containers that I take with me when I head to a waterpoint/town. Of course I cant left the 25l container anymore but you dont have to fill up. Just 10l will suffice

I also had a long hose with inline pump/filters fitted to draw water from rivers but you will need to add flocc to settle the junk and also need purification tablets/chlorine

Health issues will also be a consideration but the treatment at rural hospitals is pretty good.

If its something major, they will send you to a major hospital for the best available treatment.

The ambos recently told me that it they thought I was having a heart attack, then they would chopper me to a major centre immediately

Anyway, get out there and enjoy the last ¼ of your life )

I'm surprised that I've lasted as long as I have and wouldnt change it for the world

 

 

 



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4375
Date:

Some like caravans. Mostly those who have them.
We would not have a caravan if you gave us one. Just watching people manoeuvring into position, reversing, levelling, winding legs up and down, unhitching and then repeating it all again is enough to put us off. We would be having our first beer before most caravanners are backed into position, let alone unhitched. But that is just us. We do none of that.
And we don't lift and carry anything except the cassette and that could be on wheels. Next build will have a composting toilet. Empty once a month (for 2 people).
Water is all pumped. 300L of water tanks. 300L of diesel. A winch for the spare wheels. Solar and no generator. Lots of battery capacity. Central heating. Diesel hot water. Compressor fridge. Separate compressor deep freeze. Next build will have an induction cook top and no gas.
We can stay away remote from the shops for at least a month and in places that caravans simply can not go. Plenty of free camps if you can get away from the caravan crowds. And a solar/diesel set up is lower cost per week than gas.
Most caravans do not have the load capacity to do that.
One vehicle not two, one rego and one insurance, 4 tyres on the road not 8. It all adds up to a lot of difference.
Cheers,
Peter

__________________

OKA196, 4x4 'C' Class, DIY, self contained motorhome. 960W of solar, 400Ah of AGMs, 310L water, 280L fuel. https://www.oka4wd.com/forum/members-vehicles-public/569-oka196-xt-motorhome
 

 



Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 85
Date:

Hi Peter,That is the way to go.blankstareblankstareblankstare.cheers roker.



__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4386
Date:

Motorhomes are fine providing one only holidays in them - they have *major* limitations if one is living in them.



__________________

 

"I beseech you in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken"

Oliver Cromwell, 3rd August 1650 - in a letter to the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4375
Date:

Mike Harding wrote:

Motorhomes are fine providing one only holidays in them - they have *major* limitations if one is living in them.


 We, and many others, don't think so.

Cheers,

Peter



__________________

OKA196, 4x4 'C' Class, DIY, self contained motorhome. 960W of solar, 400Ah of AGMs, 310L water, 280L fuel. https://www.oka4wd.com/forum/members-vehicles-public/569-oka196-xt-motorhome
 

 



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4386
Date:

Peter_n_Margaret wrote:
We, and many others, don't think so.

 But you don't live in it Peter, so how would you know?



__________________

 

"I beseech you in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken"

Oliver Cromwell, 3rd August 1650 - in a letter to the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4375
Date:

Mike Harding wrote:
Peter_n_Margaret wrote:
We, and many others, don't think so.

 But you don't live in it Peter, so how would you know?


Many times 6 or 8 months on the road both in Oz and in Europe. That is living in it. 

Almost no one tours in caravans in Europe. 90%+ motorhomes, except for the UK which is higher and a few Dutch, but they typically go from home to a destination, stay for a few months and go home again.

So do you have any REAL data for full timers in Oz? I suggest that motorhomes are a bigger % of full timers than the total % of motorhomers.



__________________

OKA196, 4x4 'C' Class, DIY, self contained motorhome. 960W of solar, 400Ah of AGMs, 310L water, 280L fuel. https://www.oka4wd.com/forum/members-vehicles-public/569-oka196-xt-motorhome
 

 



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4386
Date:

You're a tourist Peter. You have a home to which to return, we nomads do not.



__________________

 

"I beseech you in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken"

Oliver Cromwell, 3rd August 1650 - in a letter to the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4375
Date:

Peter_n_Margaret wrote:

So do you have any REAL data for full timers in Oz?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



__________________

OKA196, 4x4 'C' Class, DIY, self contained motorhome. 960W of solar, 400Ah of AGMs, 310L water, 280L fuel. https://www.oka4wd.com/forum/members-vehicles-public/569-oka196-xt-motorhome
 

 



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 4386
Date:

"REAL data"?

What are you wittering on about man?

Come on Peter, pull yourself together!



__________________

 

"I beseech you in the bowels of Christ think it possible you may be mistaken"

Oliver Cromwell, 3rd August 1650 - in a letter to the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 391
Date:

I've been on the road full time in Australia coming on five years. Nearly all the nomads without a home base that l have met, have caravans.

__________________

Home is where I park the rig.

Tug 2016 D-Maxine

Den 2009 Goldie RV



Newbie

Status: Offline
Posts: 4
Date:

Hi Ian ,All the best for the future . I would be thinking caravan as if your motor home needs repairs you may find yourself homeless for a long time
cheers Chris

__________________
Say hi and have a chat


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5206
Date:

If I had no base to go home to, I would probably chose a caravan before a motorhome

One main reason, is that as we get older, health issues will arise

With the caravan parked up, it is always easier to get around in a tug, than a motorhome, for medical appointments etc

All the best with your health issues, Ian

__________________

Tony

It cost nothing to be polite



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1485
Date:

Hi Ian,

My view is not so much wether you want to be a *Man in a Van* or an *Okie in an Oka*, your situation has changed if you are now not well.

Health problems bring an entirely new set of circumstances.

Where a healthy fella might be happy spending his time in more isolated areas and travelling to town on occasions for supplies and business activities this will be difficult if poor health is introduced into the situation.
When we retired we thought briefly about a motor home compared to a caravan and we went the way of the caravan.
When we left home we had no real plan but to go where the roads took us.

Five years later and now without a house, I find myself with an illness that requires doctors and hospital visits on a regular basis.
I could not begin to imagine the inconvenience to have to pack up the Okahome just to get to the hospital or doctor or even go to the chemist and the shops for general supplies.
No one knows what the future will bring, particularly when it comes to health. Five years ago I was as fit as a fiddle.
We leave our van and travel in the tow vehicle to attend shops as well as hospital and doctors visits with absolute minimum inconvenience.

At times I talk to motorhome owners and with no exception they all state having to pack up to travel to the shops is just outright painful.

Like almost all on this forum I have no real data of permanent nomads owning motor homes over caravans but I do have perceived data and in my view the numbers of permanents in caravans outweighs the permanents in motor homes.
This perceived calculation of mine is brought about from actually staying at times in towns and tourist parks as opposed to jumping in the Okahome and camping on remote track with little contact with others.

If you dont have a home base you would be considered a permanent nomad. If you go home you are a tourist.



__________________

Regards

Rob

Chairman of the Bored

1 2  >  Last»  | Page of 2  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us
Purchase Grey Nomad bumper stickers Read our daily column, the Nomad News The Grey Nomad's Guidebook