check out the new remote control Jockey Wheel SmartBar rearview170 Beam Communications SatPhone Shop Visit Geraldton
Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Caravan to mobile home or other or reverse


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:
Caravan to mobile home or other or reverse


How many of you have sold your van/rig to purchase a mobile home for any reason?  I'd like to know those reasons. I did read a few years ago a couple that sold their 22ft van, purchased a mobile home then went back to a caravan but didnt get a chance to question why.

 

So the positives and negatives of your reasons even if they are obvious. I'm interested. TIA



__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5378
Date:

Hi Eaglemax

I have had both caravan and motorhome

I have never thought that one was better/worse than the other

Went from caravan to motorhome, because we had a cat which travelled with us

With the caravan, the cat was restricted to being harnessed to the rear seatbelt of the vehicle, when we travelled
With the motorhome, the cat had a harness with a long lead, and could walk around the motorhome, as we travelled

__________________

Tony

It cost nothing to be polite



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:

Tony Bev wrote:

Hi Eaglemax

I have had both caravan and motorhome

I have never thought that one was better/worse than the other

Went from caravan to motorhome, because we had a cat which travelled with us

With the caravan, the cat was restricted to being harnessed to the rear seatbelt of the vehicle, when we travelled
With the motorhome, the cat had a harness with a long lead, and could walk around the motorhome, as we travelled


 Well Tony/Bev, never thought of that reason. We have 2x mini foxies, if we had a MH the old one would stay on a bed and the young one (yapper) we could turn the ensuite into a soundproof room :)



__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1409
Date:

We went from a motorhome to a 4wd & Camper trailer (Tvan) in order to explore far more of this country than our motorhome would allow (although did use the motorhome on quite a few outback dirt roads). We are now looking at returning to a motorhome, albeit an off road one. Our reasons are that that we aren't getting any younger or fitter & want the increased convenience of a motorhome (less setting up) & comforts that we miss with the primarily 'outdoor living' style of travelling with a camper trailer. ie. indoor cooking & dining in bad weather or when the mozzies/flies are out in numbers.

The transition back to a motorhome won't be difficult.

Because we cut our 'extended travelling teeth' in a motorhome, the downside that many refer to, (having to pack up to go to the shops ) is of no consequence to us. We loved the motorhome way of travelling (ie. shop first & then camp) & continued it with our towed accommodation.

Our aim has always been to 'wake up in beautiful places', rather than setting up camp & going off day tripping to beautiful places. Probably sounds corny, but for us it is an essential aspect to our travel as far as 'experiencing' places as opposed to simply visiting places & 'looking' at them.


Those who have returned to a caravan from a motorhome would I imagine have done so because they missed the 'camp then explore' style of travel they had been used to.

We also would prefer not to be towing. There are several off road routes we have yet to do, mainly those with lots of sand dunes, where towing our camper would be possible but potentially much harder work that in a solo vehicle (Eg. Simpson Desert & Canning Stock Route) so we decided some time back that we would 'save' those until we were back in a motorhome.

I have zero doubt that motorhome travel is physically easier (in fact easier all round) than travelling towing a van & thus more suited to the physical restrictions of age that catch up with many of us. .



-- Edited by Cuppa on Monday 28th of August 2023 05:16:06 PM

__________________

A Nomadic Life (Current)    

The Big Trip (2008/9)     



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:

I actually placed this topic in this section as I initially mentioned the activities of caravanning against MH. Then erased the first 2 sentences.

__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:

Cuppa Ease with a motorhome, must be the most common reason as us oldies with knee back and shoulder issues endure much pain. The MH shop issues (packing up), well you must be organised. These days with UHF milk, UHF cream and even dried foods make things easy. Also electric bikes and trikes can be considered. I recall the Honda dax 70cc or postie bike could be put on the rear bumper too. Be good not worrying about weights.

__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1080
Date:

I think since Covid and it's consequences, price would now be a determining factor in that decision.

Not much under $200k for a motorhome these days where you can still buy a quality van under $100k and the tug doubles as the family vehicle.

Price is becoming an issue generally for RV's.  



__________________

Monty. RV Dealer.



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:

Again a factor I didn't think of. I wasn't aware of such high prices for MH. Plus runaround car at home.

__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 

KJB


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 839
Date:

Eaglemax wrote:

Cuppa Ease with a motorhome, must be the most common reason as us oldies with knee back and shoulder issues endure much pain. The MH shop issues (packing up), well you must be organised. These days with UHF milk, UHF cream and even dried foods make things easy. Also electric bikes and trikes can be considered. I recall the Honda dax 70cc or postie bike could be put on the rear bumper too. Be good not worrying about weights.


1972 Honda Dax/Chaly (CT70, ST70, CF70) approx. 80Kg., 

Honda CT110 (Postie) approx. 95Kg +,

1978 Yamaha Chappy (80cc)  75Kg.   

All good fun, all can be Registered for road use (either Full Rego. or Club Permit)



-- Edited by KJB on Tuesday 29th of August 2023 12:19:12 PM

__________________

KB



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:

KJB wrote:
Eaglemax wrote:

Cuppa Ease with a motorhome, must be the most common reason as us oldies with knee back and shoulder issues endure much pain. The MH shop issues (packing up), well you must be organised. These days with UHF milk, UHF cream and even dried foods make things easy. Also electric bikes and trikes can be considered. I recall the Honda dax 70cc or postie bike could be put on the rear bumper too. Be good not worrying about weights.


1972 Honda Dax/Chaly (CT70, ST70, CF70) approx. 80Kg., 

Honda CT110 (Postie) approx. 95Kg +,

1978 Yamaha Chappy (80cc)  75Kg.   

All good fun, all can be Registered for road use (either Full Rego. or Club Permit)



-- Edited by KJB on Tuesday 29th of August 2023 12:19:12 PM


 Thanks KJB.  Postie bike new about $7000 +ORC and you can buy a "buddy" seat for a second seat for a passenger. Cruising around towns would be great I think. Mounted on the back of the MH with one of those light boards Tow truck operators use.



__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:

.



Attachments
__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 

KJB


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 839
Date:

Here is my "set up" (much modified 1971 Honda CT70) on the back of our Fifth Wheeler.

 

Bike has a later Honda ZN 100 motor, 4 speed manual and 12 volt system (ex Thailand) plus other mods. Also legal with a pillion and registered on a Club Permit. 

It has been a bit of fun and a handy runabout - as well as conversation starter! Great transport when staying at congested Seaside/Beach towns.

It has been carried with us for past 9 years.

The carrier and bike have survived the Gibb River Rd., Gulf Rd., Darling River Rd., Oodnadatta Track and many more without a problem.

1  CT70 on carrier...jpg



Attachments
__________________

KB



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1409
Date:

We have had quite a few Honda stepthru's over the years, C90 & C70. Great little bikes.

screenshot_2001.jpg

When we had our bus I bought one specifically to carry at the back........ BUT ..... beware of the 60% rule.

This regulates that the max overhang behind the rear axle cannot be more than 60% of the vehicle's wheelbase (from centre of front wheel to centre of rear wheel).

The Honda Stepthru, on our bus exceeded the maximum overhang by a few cms & thus was not legal.

We ended up towing a trailer containing two larger trail bikes. However after towing them 45,000kms around the country we decided that we wouldn't bother any more, they just didn't get sufficient use to warrant doing so, especially as our preference was for outback areas where their fuel range was often insufficient. Eg I recall leaving the bus at Spring Creek & riding the bikes into the Bungles loaded up with camping gear, but we had to ask someone to take some fuel in for us in order to have enough to get back to the bus.

Fine for riding around to check out sites in towns .... except we rarely bothered, too much hassle unloading/loading them for brief forays like that. Far easier to drive the bus in & just wander around on foot.



Attachments
__________________

A Nomadic Life (Current)    

The Big Trip (2008/9)     



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5420
Date:
RE: Caravan to mobile home or other or revers(


Cuppa wrote:

We have had quite a few Honda stepthru's over the years, C90 & C70. Great little bikes.

When we had our bus I bought one specifically to carry at the back........ BUT ..... beware of the 60% rule.

This regulates that the max overhang behind the rear axle cannot be more than 60% of the vehicles wheelbase, (from centre of front wheel to centre of rear wheel). 
or 3.7 metres, whichever is lesser.


 



__________________

v



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:
RE: Caravan to mobile home or other or reverse


KJB wrote:

Here is my "set up" (much modified 1971 Honda CT70) on the back of our Fifth Wheeler.

 

Bike has a later Honda ZN 100 motor, 4 speed manual and 12 volt system (ex Thailand) plus other mods. Also legal with a pillion and registered on a Club Permit. 

It has been a bit of fun and a handy runabout - as well as conversation starter! Great transport when staying at congested Seaside/Beach towns.

It has been carried with us for past 9 years.

The carrier and bike have survived the Gibb River Rd., Gulf Rd., Darling River Rd., Oodnadatta Track and many more without a problem.

1  CT70 on carrier...jpg


 KJB, thats what I helped round up milking cows in Sheffield Tasmania as a boy. I loved it. same colour. 



__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 

KJB


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 839
Date:

Eaglemax wrote:
KJB wrote:

Here is my "set up" (much modified 1971 Honda CT70) on the back of our Fifth Wheeler.

 

Bike has a later Honda ZN 100 motor, 4 speed manual and 12 volt system (ex Thailand) plus other mods. Also legal with a pillion and registered on a Club Permit. 

It has been a bit of fun and a handy runabout - as well as conversation starter! Great transport when staying at congested Seaside/Beach towns.

It has been carried with us for past 9 years.

The carrier and bike have survived the Gibb River Rd., Gulf Rd., Darling River Rd., Oodnadatta Track and many more without a problem.

1  CT70 on carrier...jpg


 KJB, thats what I helped round up milking cows in Sheffield Tasmania as a boy. I loved it. same colour. 


 Yes, a whole generation of motorcycle enthusiasts worldwide learnt to ride on the Honda CT70/Dax (1970's to 1990's) but then I think the Yamaha PeeWee50 took over and is still doing its job today....! 



__________________

KB

KJB


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 839
Date:

Cuppa wrote:

We have had quite a few Honda stepthru's over the years, C90 & C70. Great little bikes.

screenshot_2001.jpg

When we had our bus I bought one specifically to carry at the back........ BUT ..... beware of the 60% rule.

This regulates that the max overhang behind the rear axle cannot be more than 60% of the vehicle's wheelbase (from centre of front wheel to centre of rear wheel).

The Honda Stepthru, on our bus exceeded the maximum overhang by a few cms & thus was not legal.

We ended up towing a trailer containing two larger trail bikes. However after towing them 45,000kms around the country we decided that we wouldn't bother any more, they just didn't get sufficient use to warrant doing so, especially as our preference was for outback areas where their fuel range was often insufficient. Eg I recall leaving the bus at Spring Creek & riding the bikes into the Bungles loaded up with camping gear, but we had to ask someone to take some fuel in for us in order to have enough to get back to the bus.

Fine for riding around to check out sites in towns .... except we rarely bothered, too much hassle unloading/loading them for brief forays like that. Far easier to drive the bus in & just wander around on foot.


 Super reliable, beautifully made. We had a new one in 1965 - 50cc version- for farm work.



__________________

KB



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 8609
Date:

KJB wrote:

 Super reliable, beautifully made. We had a new one in 1965 - 50cc version- for farm work.


 I bought a little Honda step-thru in 1985, had knobby tyres fitted, what a great little bike for just hopping on to go to do something on the other side of the farm.



__________________

Possum; AKA:- Ali El-Aziz Mohamed Gundawiathan

Sent from my imperial66 typewriter using carrier pigeon, message sticks and smoke signals.



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:

Possum3 wrote:
KJB wrote:

 Super reliable, beautifully made. We had a new one in 1965 - 50cc version- for farm work.


 I bought a little Honda step-thru in 1985, had knobby tyres fitted, what a great little bike for just hopping on to go to do something on the other side of the farm.


 My uncles dairy farm circa 1970 had a distant section so rounding up the Jerseys was a 2km walk total. My cousins suggested the Dax Honda and it didnt take him long to get accustomed to it. 



__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 289
Date:

G'day Tony,

Have just caught up on your post.

I have just sold my beautiful 2021 Coromal Appeal 554 and am expecting to pick up my new Avan Ovation M9C this month.

The reason. My partner has owned and driven a motorhome but is not keen to drive tug towing a caravan but we will now be able share driving duties.

She also says that if I ever become incapacitated, she would not hook up van to tug to drive me to a hospital or to help.

We have just completed an 11,000 km, 14 week trip in van with 2 little dogs and love the on-the-road life.

Plan A is to get motorhome, become accustomed to it and do a few mods then head out for two years or more with 2 little dogs.

House will be rented out and this income will, hopefully, help support our lifestyle.

The motorhome is larger than the caravan was and is of a very easy-to-use layout.

Cheers,

Roy.

__________________


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 1477
Date:

Thankyou Roy. Most of us grey nomads are on the wrong side of 60. That means personalising our lives to suit. Your wife being able to share driving and driving if in the case of a medical incident is a wise move. I once read where a mobile home owner took 4 minutes to set up. That's a bonus to. We have our 2x mini foxies. Enjoy your travels

__________________

Be nice... if I wanted my school teacher here I would have invited him... 

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us
Purchase Grey Nomad bumper stickers Read our daily column, the Nomad News The Grey Nomad's Guidebook